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Tag: skin care

Skin Care Glossary

When trying out a new product or service, you can be bombarded with terminology that leaves you scratching your head. I broke down some of the most common ingredient in skin care to help with the confusion.

ACTIVATED CHARCOAL

Long used in emergency rooms to treat alcohol poisoning and drug overdoses, this form of carbon — found in cleansers, masks, toothpastes, health drinks — has been specially treated to increase its absorbency, allowing it to sponge up dirt and oil from pores (or toxins from the stomach when taken internally).

ALGURONIC ACID

A blend of naturally sourced, sustainably produced algae extracts developed and trademarked for the Algenist line, it claims to minimize wrinkles while firming and brightening the skin.

ALPHA HYDROXY ACIDS (AHAS)

These chemicals loosen the fluid that binds surface skin cells together, allowing dead ones to be whisked away. This “glue” becomes denser as we age, slowing down the natural cell-turnover process that reveals younger skin making AHAs a particularly useful ingredient in fine line-fighting creams and cleansers.

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

The building blocks of the proteins that make up collagen and elastin — substances that give the skin its structural support. Aging and a combination of external factors (including UV light and environmental toxins) reduce the level of amino acids in the body; creams containing amino acids may help restore them.

AZELAIC ACID

It’s a natural component of wheat, barley, rye, and the yeast normally living on human skin. Used in topical rosacea and acne treatments, synthetic versions help kill bacteria living in pores while reducing inflammation. It’s also used to lighten melasma patches and other hyperpigmented areas.

BENZOYL PEROXIDE

An acne medicine that kills pimple-causing bacteria and exfoliates pores. It can be found in concentrations up to 10 percent in over-the-counter products.

BIOTIN

Small amounts of this B vitamin are found in carrots, almonds, milk, and other foods. Aside from helping the body process fats and sugars, oral biotin is important for regulating hair and nail growth. Shampoos and conditioners containing it claim the ingredient reduces hair breakage and increases elasticity.

BOTOX

The trademark name for one of the forms of botulinum toxin used in injections targeting facial wrinkles. Botox paralyzes facial muscles, such as those that cause frown lines, in order to soften wrinkles.

BROAD SPECTRUM

A term for sunscreens proven to defend against both UVA (aging) and UVB (burning) radiation. Passing the FDA’s broad-spectrum test shows that a product provides UVA protection that is proportional to its UVB protection. “Scientific data demonstrated that products that are ‘Broad Spectrum SPF 15 [or higher]’ have been shown to reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging when used with other sun protection measures, in addition to helping prevent sunburn,” states the FDA website.

CITRIC ACID

Found in many fruits, the antioxidant alpha hydroxy acid acts as a natural preservative. When used in peels, masks, and washes, it brightens and exfoliates the upper layers of the skin, encouraging new collagen formation.

COLLAGEN

This protein makes up 80 percent of the skin, and its fibers give skin its firmness and strength. Collagen naturally breaks down over time, but certain ingredients, such as retinol and peptides (including Matrixyl), can stimulate new collagen production. The most abundant protein in the human body, it makes skin thick, strong, and smooth. Laser treatments and retinoids build it up; UV rays and free radicals tear it down.

COOLSCULPTING

Invented by Harvard dermatologists, Dieter Manstein and R. Rox Anderson, CoolSculpting is a nonsurgical fat-reduction treatment that uses extreme cold to permanently kill fat cells (i.e. the science of cryolipolysis). Crystalized fat cells are naturally metabolized and eliminated by the body over the course of several weeks.

DIHYDROXYACETONE (DHA)

A natural carbohydrate, DHA is the active ingredient in most sunless tanners.

DIMETHICONE

A slippery form of silicone that hydrates and protects the skin; often found in oil-free moisturizers.

DMAE

Shorthand for dimethylaminoethanol, it’s produced by the human brain and found in sardines and other small fish. While the research is mixed, oral and topical forms claim to protect skin-cell membranes from free-radical damage, while firming, smoothing and brightening the complexion.

ELASTIN

Stretchy structural proteins that allow skin to snap back into place, elastin is particularly vulnerable to sun damage.

ELLAGIC ACID

Commonly added to skin-care products and supplements, this polyphenol exists naturally in pecans, pomegranates, raspberries, strawberries, cranberries, walnuts, dark-colored grapes, and red wines, and possesses antioxidant and anti-cancer properties.

EPIGALLOCATECHIN GALLATE (EGCG)

The main active component of green tea, this anti-inflammatory polyphenol has been shown to reduce sun damage and slow signs of aging by neutralizing free radicals.

FIBROBLASTS

Plentiful in connective tissue throughout the body, including the dermis, these cells produce the collagen and elastin responsible for keeping skin pliant and springy. Topical retinoids ramp up collagen production in fibroblasts.

FILLER

Injectable dermal fillers, made from FDA-approved hyaluronic acid or a biostimulatory (collagen-growing) materials, restore fullness to the face. They can be used to plump lips, minimize wrinkles and scars, smooth under-eye hollows, and contour cheeks, temples, noses, and jaw lines.

FRUIT ENZYMES

Typically sourced from papaya, pineapple, and pumpkin, they break down the keratin proteins comprising dead skin cells, offering a mild form of exfoliation.

GLYCATION

This age-accelerating process occurs when sugar molecules in the bloodstream bind to protein tissue throughout the body, creating advanced glycation end products (AGEs), free-radical damage, and inflammation. Among the tissues affected are the collagen and elastin fibers responsible for keeping skin smooth, plump, and flexible, which is why scientists now link a chronically high-glycemic diet to premature wrinkling and sagging.

GLYCERIN

It’s a humectant, meaning it pulls moisture from the atmosphere to hydrate skin. Commonly used in moisturizers and hydrating cleansers, this is an inexpensive ingredient.

GLYCOLIC ACID

An alpha hydroxy acid derived from sugarcane, it dissolves the gluelike substance between skin cells, aiding in exfoliation and improving skin texture. It’s commonly used in high-end products, such as cleansers, creams, and peels.

HEMP SEED OIL

Pressed from the seeds of industrial hemp plants, this supercharged moisturizer packs vitamins, minerals, and inflammation-quelling essential fatty acids.

HYALURONIC ACID

A sugar molecule found naturally in the skin, it increases skin’s moisture content and prevents water loss. It can hold 1,000 times its weight in water and is typically found in expensive creams and serums.

HYDRAFACIAL

The trademarked name for a four-step exfoliating treatment offered at spas and dermatologist offices. The facial includes a gentle acid peel, vacuum pore extraction, a moisturizing cocktail of hyaluronic acid and antioxidants, and a tailored take-home kit of topical.

INGESTIBLE

The common term for any oral beauty aid — pills, drinks, powders, and the like.

INJECTABLE

Any substance capable of being injected into the body. In the cosmetic realm, it refers mainly to neuromodulators, fillers, and fat dissolvers.

INTENSE PULSED LIGHT (IPL)

A machine that emits many wavelengths of light — as opposed to lasers, which use just one concentrated beam — to remove hair or erase acne, dark spots, wrinkles, spider veins, and more. While gentler and less expensive than lasers, it isn’t always as effective.

ISOLAZ

FDA-cleared for mild to moderate acne, this in-office device combines vacuum suction with broadband light to extract gunk from pores and destroy zit-causing bacteria before infusing skin with treatment serums.

JUVÉDERM

The trademarked name of a gel made from hyaluronic acid that’s injected into wrinkles and lips to restore lost volume.

JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC

A fine hyaluronic acid-based filler that plumps lips and smoothes lines for up to one year.

JUVÉDERM VOLLURE XC

FDA-approved for the correction of moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds (think: smile lines), this injectable filler, made from sugar-based hyaluronic acid, may last up to 18 months. Finer and more fluid than the original Juvéderm, it moves naturally (and imperceptibly) with facial expressions.

JUVÉDERM VOLUMA XC

Made of hyaluronic acid, a water-absorbing sugar molecule found throughout the human body, and spiked with the anesthetic lidocaine, this injectable gel filler is FDA-approved for restoring lost volume in the cheeks.

KERATOSIS PILARIS

These red bumps on the legs and the backs of arms occur when sticky cells within the hair follicle clump together to form a plug, preventing them from being whisked away through routine exfoliation. This common condition, believed to be genetic, can be minimized but not cured with lactic acid creams or scrubs.

KOJIC ACID

This skin lightener, especially popular in Japan, has been proven to be effective at blocking the production of new melanin in the skin, but it can also cause skin irritation when used in higher concentrations.

KYBELLA (DEOXYCHOLIC ACID)

An FDA-approved injectable treatment for fat under the chin, the drug dissolves the membranes lining fat cells, causing them to release their contents, which are then expunged by the body’s own immune cells over several weeks.

LED

Light-emitting diode devices give off a narrow range of a specific wavelength of light. (Different wavelengths target different skin issues; for example, blue light kills the bacteria known to cause acne.) Much less intense than lasers or IPL, many LED devices are safe enough for hand-held use at home.

LICOCHALCONE

A molecule found in licorice-root extract, licochalcone has the ability to both soothe inflammation and help control the production of oil in the skin, making it an effective treatment for acne and redness.

LIPOSOME

A tiny vesicle (bubble-like sac), similar in construction to a cell membrane, used to encapsulate ingredients and enhance penetration into the skin; an effective delivery system.

MICRODERMABRASION

Performed by dermatologists and facialists, this treatment exfoliates the top layer of dead skin cells with a wand that sprays on and then vacuums off extremely fine aluminum-oxide crystals. A newer form of the technology uses a vibrating diamond tip in place of the crystals.

MICRONEEDLING

A cosmetic procedure during which a device studded with tiny needles pierces the skin to incite the body’s natural healing response, resulting in increased cell turnover and collagen production to improve skin’s tone and texture. At-home tools have shorter pins, which work superficially; professional devices with longer needles drive deeper for more significant improvements in wrinkles and scars (along with greater downtime).

NEUROMODULATORS

Injectable purified toxins that relax the muscles responsible for the development of expression lines, like those on the forehead, between the brows, and around the eyes.

NIACINAMIDE

A form of vitamin B3, it strengthens the skin’s outer layers, improves elasticity, and curbs redness and irritation.

OCTOCRYLENE

An active ingredient in sunscreens, this clear, colorless chemical offers only limited protection against UVA and UVB rays on its own, but can stabilize and strengthen the sun-protective powers of any UV filters it’s combined with.

OCCLUSIVES

Thick moisturizing ingredients, such as petrolatum, that slow the evaporation of water from the skin’s surface.

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

Abundant in herring, mackerel, wild salmon, walnuts, flaxseed, and olive oil, these essential fatty acids maintain the function of cell membranes throughout the body, preserving cells’ ability to take in nutrients, dispose of waste, and hold onto water. In the epidermis, this can translate to smoother, more supple, hydrated skin.

PARABENS

A class of preservatives used to protect cosmetics against the growth of bacteria and fungi. These controversial ingredients — including methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben — have been shown to possess weak estrogen-like properties, but the FDA deems them safe when used at very low levels (.01 to .3 percent) in cosmetics.

PARSOL

A trademarked class of sunscreen ingredients that absorb specific wavelengths of UVB and UVA light, minimizing photo damage to the skin. The most widely used, Parsol 1789 (known generically as avobenzone), absorbs UVA rays. Many broad-spectrum sunscreens pair the ingredient with others that filter out UVB light.

PETROLATUM

A purified by-product of petroleum, this thick, odorless, and colorless substance coats the skin to hydrate and prevent water loss and is used in standard (i.e., not oil-free) moisturizers. It can clog pores and cause acne in those who are prone.

Q-SWITCHED LASERS

Delivering quick, powerful pulses of energy, these lasers (like the Nd: YAG, the Ruby, the Alexandrite) heat and destroy pigment in the skin, making them most effective at clearing brown spots and tattoo ink.

RETIN-A

The brand name for the prescription vitamin A derivative tretinoin. First approved by the FDA for the treatment of acne, Retin-A was eventually found to fight signs of aging by speeding up exfoliation, repairing skin on a molecular level, and boosting new collagen production.

RETINOIDS

This is the catchall phrase used to describe all vitamin A derivatives used in skin care.

RETINOL

A derivative of vitamin A used in fine line-fighting products to stimulate the turnover of skin cells and increase collagen production. The maximum amount allowed in over-the-counter products is 1 percent. Retinyl palmitate and retinaldehyde are weaker, less-irritating forms of retinol.

ROSACEA

A chronic skin disease marked by persistent redness, easy flushing, broken blood vessels, and pimples on the nose and cheeks primarily. Rosacea tends to run in families, especially those of Northern or Eastern European descent. The cause is unknown; there is no cure; and controlling triggers (heat, UV, spicy foods, alcohol) is crucial to treatment.

STEARYL ALCOHOL

A fat that binds together the ingredients in creams and cleansers and gives them a silky texture.

SQUALENE

Rich in fatty acids and antioxidants, this natural moisturizer is made by the skin, but diminishes with age. For skin-care purposes, it can also be derived from olives, rice bran, wheat germ, sugarcane, or palm trees.

SULFATES

These cleansing agents remove dirt and oil and are responsible for creating lather. There are more than 100 different varieties — some synthetic, others from natural sources, like coconut or palm oil. They’re found in facial cleansers, body washes, shampoos, and shaving creams. All types have the potential to dry and irritate the skin. They’ve come under scrutiny in recent years for their potential damage to the environment.


THERMAGE

A radio-wave machine used by doctors to penetrate into the deepest layers of the skin and generate heat that stimulates the formation of new collagen to firm skin.

TITANIUM DIOXIDE

A mineral in sunscreens that shields the skin from UVA and UVB rays.

TRANEXAMIC ACID

A synthetic derivative of the amino acid lysine, it interferes with UV light-induced pigment production to even the complexion. Both topical and oral forms are now being used to treat melasma and other pigmentary disorders.

TRICHLOROACETIC ACID (TCA)

A key ingredient in chemical peels used to treat sun damage and hyperpigmentation, TCA promotes shedding of the outermost layer of dead skin cells, allowing new cells to rise to the surface in the days following treatment. TCA peels are generally light to medium strength, with the former requiring a series of two to three for best results; the latter requiring only a single session (but carrying about a week of downtime).

ULTHERAPY

A non-invasive FDA-cleared treatment that relies on ultrasound energy to lift and tighten the skin by boosting collagen synthesis.

UVA RAYS

The wavelength of ultraviolet light that leads to signs of aging by destroying existing collagen and elastin within the skin and undermining the body’s ability to create more of each. The rays cause skin cancer, and they are also generated in tanning beds. They are constant throughout the year, which is why sun protection should be worn daily regardless of season.

UVB RAYS

The high-energy wavelength of ultraviolet light that leads to darkened pigment in the form of tanning, freckles, and age spots — plus, of course, sunburns. They are strongest in summer months.

VBEAM

A pulsed-dye laser used primarily to treat vascular issues, like broken capillaries, rosacea, port wine stains, bruises, and the like. It works by targeting and collapsing offending blood vessels, and is safe for all skin tones.

VITAMIN C (ASCORBIC ACID)

An antioxidant that boosts collagen production and inhibits pigment formation. Like many antioxidants, it’s an unstable molecule that can break down quickly when exposed to light and air. Common derivatives, like ascorbyl palmitate and tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate, tend to be more stable than pure ascorbic acid but slower acting.

VITAMIN E (TOCOPHEROL)

This moisturizing antioxidant protects against free-radical damage.

XEOMIN

An FDA-approved neurotoxin, similar to Botox and Dysport, it blocks the release of chemicals that cause muscle contractions to soften frown lines. Said to be a purer form of the botulinum toxin, it may be less likely to cause irritation and allergic reactions.

ZINC OXIDE

A mineral in sunscreen that prevents UVA and UVB light from entering skin and doing damage.

Have you heard of photosensitive essential oils?

Essential oils are great for adding a natural fragrance to cosmetics, however, essential oils can react to our environment in ways that harm our skin. Specifically, citrus oils reacting with sunlight, and some are photosensitive. Photosensitization is the process in which ultraviolet light radiation combines with a particular substance and causes chemical or biological changes. Some essential oils contain furocoumarins, a special class of chemicals that can change the photosensitization of the skin. This can cross-links with the skin cell DNA, in turn making the skin especially susceptible to UV radiation. This can all so damage the cell membrane, organelles, and proteins. If exposed to sunlight after a topical application of photosensitive oil, the skin may become temporarily darkly pigmented, red, or irritated. Symptoms of this can be severe sunburn, darkening of the skin, swelling, and blistering. Often times you will see this occur in areas where perfume is usually applied such as the neck, decollete, wrists and inside of the elbows.

Which oils are photosensitive?

  • Bitter orange oil
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemon
  • Lime
  • Angelica root
  • Bergamot
  • Mandarin leaf
  • Rue
  • Cumin
  • Angelica root
  • Lemon verbena
  • Fig leaf absolute

How to avoid photosensitization

Avoid the sun for 12-18 hours after you applied a photosensitive essential oil. the easiest way to avoid photosensitization is to not apply a furanocoumarin-containing essential oil to the skin at all. Covering up any skin to which phototoxic essential oils have been applied can help prevent a phototoxic reaction however thin fabrics may not provide adequate protection. Phototoxic essential oils can still be used topically on the skin even with exposure to UV light as long as they are safely diluted. Using photosensitive oils at nighttime helps reduce the risk associated with these oils.

Many people write off all citrus oils as being photosensitive but there are several that are safe to use, including steam distilled version. Although furanocoumarins are present in cold-pressed versions, the molecules are not volatile and remain behind during steam distillation/

Sun safe essential oils include:

  • Lemon -steam distilled
  • Lime -steam distilled
  • Bergamot -steam distilled- furanocoumarin free
  • Mandarin – cold press
  • Orange, sweet cold pressed
  • Tangerine – cold pressed

Micro-Channeling on the rise!

Micro-Channeling, what is that?

Micro-Channeling is a minimally invasive skin treatment that targets and diminishes the appearance of visible wrinkles, unwanted acne scars, and sun-spots. During the treatment, Joanna creates tiny pinholes to the outermost layer of the skin promoting a natural healing response. The pinholes also function as micro-channels for quick absorption when the serum is applied to the skin. The serum activates collagen-producing cells in your body to increase collagen production and create permanent new healthy skin!

Micro-channeling may be used as a separate treatment only or as an additional add-on to other skin treatments to enhance the effectiveness of skin health. To get an idea, Hydrafacial or chemical peels are perfect treatments for Micro-channeling pairing.

I am interested, can you tell me more about the procedure?

I myself, love this procedure. I highly recommended Micro-channeling to all my clients that are looking to improve their skin health, in the least abrasive way.

The treatment requires the usage of a handheld device, lightly grazing across the skin using a stamping motion type of pattern. Unlike micro-needling, this instrument does not cause damage or trauma to the surface of the skin. These microscopic abrasions stimulate and produces new collagen and elastin.

After the stamping phase is complete, we apply a skin serum to target areas to nourish the skin and regenerate new skin cells. There will be some downtime during the recovery stage, but it should be no longer than a few days. You can do your face, arms, neck, and stomach to regenerate tighter healthier skin.

Skin Serum

The skin serum that is applied is a well-formulated concoction contains the following ingredients with benefits. (take home an extra vile for $90)

Anti Aging

  • Vitamins A, B5, C, E
  • CoEnzyme 10
  • Plant Isoflavones 

Anti Wrinkle & Stimulate Collagen Production

  • Peptides
  • Human Growth Factors
  • Bone Marrow

Facial Hydration

  • Ceramide A2
  • Sodium Hyaluronate

Aftercare

During your recovery stage, it is important to keep up with maintenance in order to maximize the result. I highly recommend applying Sorella’s Quench & Protect Hydrating SPF 30. (purchase this on your next visit $51)

  • Leaves skin deeply moisturized
  • Excellent makeup base
  • Water-resistant
  • Provides both UVA/UVB protection
  • Provides pure physical sun protection

Be Comfortable & Confident in your skin

No one should feel insecure about their skin, but the reality is that we all are fighting the same battle. Whether it is signs of aging or acne scars, we get self-conscious about our skin. When you are ready to take matters into your own hands, call or book online with Joanna. Together we can redefine age. $360 a treatment or $260 when added to another facial treatment, ie: a Hydrafacial.

You can call, text or book online 949-355-5482

Sorella Apothecary Skin Care Regime

Trying to find a routine that is perfect for your skin can be tricky, especially because everyone has slightly different skin concerns. Many of you know I love Sorella Apothecary and can’t get enough of their products. I devised a list of products that are perfect for your skin type. Most products listed are found in my spa and were chosen for cleansing and prepping, treating and correcting, moisturizing and protecting, and exfoliating and nourishing that may be implemented into your skin routine.

Dry skin

         This is perfect for those who have concerns about preventative aging, aging skin, and/or sporadic breakouts.

  1. To cleanse your face, I suggest using the Apricot Mango Cleansing Milk followed by a Watermelon Mint Hydrating mist in both the morning and evenings.
  2. After cleansing, I suggest using the Main Squeeze Hydrating Serum as well as the Lemon Lightening Serum to treat and correct the skin in both the morning and evenings.
  3. To moisturize and protect use the Blueberry Milk Moisturizer in the morning and night and The Balm at night only.
  4. Exfoliating and Nourishing the skin is very important. The Papaya & Pumpkin Mask, Cherry Pepper Peel, and Blackberry Lime Fruitfoliant are my personal favorites.
  5. Additional products that are good for dry skin are the All Night Elixir and the Facial in a Bottle.

Normal or Combination Skin

         This is perfect for those who are concerned about preventative aging, aging skin, sporadic breakouts, and/or just sensitive.

  1. To start off your mornings and in the evenings, I suggest using the Orange You Jelly Cleanser and the Watermelon Mint Hydrating Mist, twice a day of course.
  2. Treating and correcting can be done with the Main Squeeze Hydrating Serum and the Pomegranate Acai Serum on both the morning and night.
  3. Blueberry Milk Moisturizers are great for moisturizing and protecting and should be applied twice a day. I also suggest using the Tropical Topical Matte SPF 30 in the morning.
  4. Exfoliate and nourish with the Cherry Pepper Peel or the Papaya & Pumpkin Mask.
  5. In addition to these products I also suggest using The Balm, All Night Elixir, and the Blackberry Lime Fruitfoliant.

Oily or Combination Skin

         These products are specifically chosen for those who have sensitive skin, frequent or severe breakouts, and/or are concerned about preventative aging or aging skin.

  1. I love using the Orange You Jelly Cleanser for cleaning and prepping my face twice a day. This can be paired nicely with the Spiced Wine Toner and the Watermelon Mint Hydrating Mist at morning and night, or the Lychee Willow Bark Deep Clean twice a week.
  2. The Main Squeeze Hydrating Serum is great to treat and correct skin concerns twice a day, especially when paired with the Pomegranate Acai Antioxidant Serum or the Facial in a Bottle.
  3. Daily Greens Moisturizer will moisturize and protect your skin if used twice a day. The Tropical Topical Matte SPF 30 is a great addition to your morning routine as well.
  4. My top three products for exfoliating and nourishing would have to be the Cherry Pepper Peel, Mint Poppy Seed Polish, and the Papaya & Pumpkin Mask.
  5. The additional product I recommend would have to be the Facial in a Bottle, Lemon Lightening Serum, and The Balm.

How to Pick the Best Acid for Your Skin

When shopping for new skin care products, you may notice there is a long list of acids and ingredients you cannot pronounce and may not recognize. It is important to know what each kind of acid can do to your face and what skin type of skin it is best for.

Glycolic acid is very common in skin care. It exfoliates the skin, reduces fine lines, hyperpigmentation, dark spots, and helps with uneven skin tone. This acid is for all skin types and is great for those who have wrinkles and fine lines.

Salicylic is another common acid. This will exfoliate the skin, clear your pores, treat breakouts, and build your elastin and collagen. It is recommended for those who have combination, oily, or acne-prone skin.

Hyaluronic acid will hydrate and plump the skin by drawing in moisture from surrounding environments. This is for all skin types, especially best for dry or acne prone skin that needs an oil-free option.

L-ascorbic acid is also known as pure vitamin C. This is an anti-inflammatory that prevents UV damage, stimulates collagen, and brightens your skin tone. This acid is perfect for all skin types.

Ferulic acid will enhance vitamin A, promote healthy skin, prevent sun damage, fight free radicals, and protect collagen. Like L-ascorbic acid, this is perfect for all skin types.

Citric Acid speeds up cell renewal and balances the pH of your skin. This is best for those with hyperpigmented skin, have dark spots. This will agitate sensitive skin.

Lactic acid exfoliates the skin, speeds up cell turnover, and is naturally occurring. This is great for all skin types, particularly those with acne scarring.

Now that you know a little bit more about the acids that could be found in your face washes, cleansers, and toners, you can choose a product better suited for your skin.

Light Therapy

LED light therapy is a painless skin care treatment that has so many benefits, specifically stimulating collagen and treating mild to moderate acne.  LED uses an array of bright light-emitting diodes that send low-level light energy into the deepest layers of your skin.

Red light stimulates cellular activity to produce collagen and give your skin a plump look. This helps minimize fine lines and wrinkles, sun damage, stretch marks, and reduce the redness that could be the result of aggressive IPL or laser treatments. These results won’t be as dramatic as plastic surgery, IPL, or last, however, it’s gentler, natural, and less expensive.

Blue light works by killing Propionibacterium acnes, which is the bacteria that lives below the surface of the skin and is responsible for acne.

Both red and blue light LEDs are effective when used repeatedly. It is important to get this treatment every month or two and can be a part of larger treatments such as a HydraFacial.

Some other interesting points about LED therapy is that it can help treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in winter months. Also, your eyes can’t be hurt by LED light, so they do not have to be covered.

These treatments are a good choice for those who want to boost collagen or treat mild to moderate acne. This works best in conjunction with a regular skin care routine that you can develop with me.

Gut-Skin Axis

What is gut health and how can it affect your skin?
A lot of the time we treat skin concerns from the outside, but your gut health could be the true key to having flawless skin. When your gut is unhealthy, it can have a huge impact on your skin, this connection is known as the gut-skin axis. There is scientific evidence that suggests a close bidirectional connection between your gut and your skin. This is linked to three common skin disorders: acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis.

The Gut-Skin Axis
Many skin conditions are caused by gut issues and vice versa. A study found that a higher number of patients with rosacea also tested positive for a gut condition called small intestine bacterial overgrowth. When treating small intestine bacterial overgrowth, 70% of the patients was an improvement in their rosacea, demonstrating a strong association between the two: treating small intestine bacterial overgrowth alone improved the skin. Inflammatory bowel disease is also associated with a greater risk of inflaming the skin in conditions such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, or rosacea. This relationship is likely due to the fact that both inflammatory bowel disease and skin conditions like psoriasis have similar inflammatory pathways that may begin in the gut. Research has also found that there is a strong association between gut health and acne with several studies linking an imbalance in gut bacteria with a high prevalence of acne. Therefore, healing the gut is one of the best ways to treat chronic inflammatory skin issues.

Diet and Gut Health
The imbalance of the gut microbiome is known as dysbiosis and can cause the immune system to suffer while also increasing skin inflammation. Gut bacteria regulate many functions in the body including fat metabolism, intracellular signaling, and cell growth. When bad bacteria outweigh the good, it can disrupt these pathways and cause inflammation. Diet is the major culprit in a poor microbiome, processed foods, sugar, alcohol artificial sweeteners, and low fiber can all negatively impact the gut. Stress, poor sleep, and environmental toxins also play a role in disturbing the gut-skin axis.

Improving the Gut
For improving skin health, focus on a fiber-rich diet. Research shows that a wide variety of plant-based foods, like whole grains, fruits, veggies, nuts, and seeds can improve the diversity of your gut bacteria. For additional support, probiotics can be used to help balance the gut-skin connection, 80% of participants showed clinical improvement after using probiotics as they help boost the immune system and reduce oxidative stress and reduce inflammation. In addition to probiotics, prebiotics is also key for a healthy gut. Prebiotics are foods for the probiotics in your guy; for healthy skin, both are key. Prebiotic foods are rich in fibers your gut bacteria ferments. Bananas, onion, garlic, Jerusalem artichoke, apple skins, and beans are all great prebiotics.

To treat chronic inflammatory skin issues, healing the gut is one of the best ways to do that. Follow these simple guidelines and you should see an improvement in your skin, however, this is subjective to each person depending on the severity of their skin concern.

Ditch the Dark Spots

Dark spots are very common. Older adults, people with fair skin, and those who have spent a lot of time in the sun are most prone to dark spots. They appear most often on sun exposed areas, such as the face, hands, shoulders, and arms. Age spots are harmless and don’t need treatment however in some cases, prescription creams and procedures can make them less noticeable. People with darker skin, a spot that is a few shades darker than the skin usually fades within 6 to 12 months.

There are several causes for dark spots. Sun Damage is the most common after exposing skin to the sun or tanning beds. Hormones can play a factor as well. Melasma is a skin condition that causes small patches of skin to have discoloration. This is common in women during pregnancy. Medications can also lead to increased skin pigmentation and dark spots. The most common medications that cause this are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tetracyclines, and psychotropic drugs. Dark spots can also develop after inflammation of this skin. Inflammation of the skin can be caused by eczema, psoriasis, injury to the skin, or acne. Diabetes can cause areas of the skin to become dark. Conditions associated with diabetes include acanthosis nigricans which causes darkened, velvety skin, and shine spots which people may confuse with age spots.

Here are some ways to treat dark spots:

To prevent dark spots, I suggest using SPF every day, cover up the skin when it is sunny out, and avoid peak sun hours as UV exposure is the main culprit of sun spots.

Reserve your Free HydraFacial at our Signature Event, Nov 1st, 4-8pm

You’re Invited to an Exclusive Event to Experience a Free HydraFacial
Thursday, Nov. 1st 2018 4pm -8pm
Happy Hour @ Joanna Young Skin
Bring a friend and enjoy the Perks.
Experience a HydraFacial first hand while you
enjoy some wine, cheese and chocolate!
Face Fall face-first with an amazing HydraFacial!
$100 reservation fee guarantees your spot,
and can be applied to any service you’d like.

3 steps, 30 minutes
Regular Hydrafacial treatments can help your other products work better

Cleanse and Peel, Extract and Hydrate, Fuse and Protect
3 steps to the best skin of your life.

Click to Book
Signature Vip Event 01/11

 

Skin Care Treatments and Home Care

Our skin is constantly changing due to climate (changing seasons or vacationing) hormones or stress. Facial treatments can help slow down the aging process and prevent the appearance of wrinkles.  These treatments can be as simple as a sound home care routine to professional exfoliant treatments, lymphatic drainage and hydrating treatments

 

If you are dedicated and committed to helping your skin health, home care is a big part of maintaining your skin.  Any professional treatments will have less effect unless

you follow a good at home care routine. It can be as basic as a cleanser (cleansing twice on occasion), eye cream, a good hydrating serum or moisturizer (no matter if your dry or oily) and broad-spectrum sunscreen. If you want to help your skin cell turn over you can add in an exfoliate 1-2 times a week, this really helps bring blood to the surface, circulation and give you a nice glow.

 

Massaging your face with an anti-aging cream will immediately increase the blood circulation and oxygen flow, which promotes collagen production and enhances the elasticity of your skin.  However, applying product to the outer layer of dead skin and peach fuzz is just a place for your product to hang out, inhibiting it from penetrating into your skin.  Having your skin professionally exfoliated removes the grey layer of dry skin off your face so products can penetrate much better.  Dermaplaning is a great way to exfoliate the first layer of dead skin plus the vellus hair (peach fuzz).

 

Peels and the Hydrafacial

I recommend monthly treatments to address areas of concern your skin.  Fall is a really good time of year to start a peel series. I usually have my clients do a series of 3, every 4 weeks.  Then maintain with a Hydrafacial membership, once a month to enhance your skin’s health.   Hydrafacial is 3 steps and only 30 minutes, cleanse + peel (uncover a new layer of skin with a gentle exfoliation and relaxing resurfacing), extract + hydrate (remove debris from pores with painless suction, nourish with intense moisturizers that quench the skin) and fuse + protect (saturate the skin with antioxidants and peptides to maximize your glow).

 

Lymphatic Drainage

If you really want healthy, glowing skin and to fight the signs of aging I also recommend a Lymphatic Drainage facial which works to improve circulation, as well as detoxify, tone, and firm skin.  We can work on the entire body, face, arms, back, legs.

 

And always always always don’t forget Sunscreen. SPF 30 is a must every morning. If you maintain your skin with a solid home care routine, professional treatments to maintain, address concerns and wear sunscreen daily you can reverse signs of aging.  I am committed.  Are you?

Book Your Facial Today!

Joanna Young Skin, 359 San Miguel Dr. #202, Newport Beach, Ca 92660

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